Is it Too Late for a Web Strategy?

Old spice man

If you don't know this man, then you're missing out on one of the more popular twists in popular culture and marketing of 2010. 

This is the Old Spice campaign's man of mystery.  Intentionally I did not insert the web video, nor am I interested in chasing down the viewer stats, though sales report isn't great.  It's here because the ad reference exemplifes multi-channel linked marketing strategy and came up  in last Friday's monthly Chicago Booth Alumni Club's Discussion around  Strategic Management Practices.

Wearing my research hat, and doubling as a typical consumer, the first place I turned to find the reference was to type the key word phrase "old spice man" into my google search bar located at the top of my web browser. My search was not to purchase, engage in conversation or to gain proximity to someone with product experience –that would need  some different key words.  The campaign as well as my search process shows the evolution of the internet and the effect of its influence in our lives.  The shifting trends exhibited below in this wonderful chart  was the focus by Chris Anderson and Michael Wolff in the provocatively titled September 2010 article in Wired The Web is Dead, long live the Internet

Internet traffic trends 2010

CISCO compiled data using the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA). The chart suggests that Video and Peer to Peer traffic is increasing while the use of the world wide web is declining.  This data is somewhat misleading and the chart's suggestions that mobile apps, and other specialized channel options, will displace the web browser  is not so clear-cut.

Is this graph a credible and reliable translation of the geek speak from  CAIDA?  A more recent  analysis than what appeared in Wired, expresses the following:

" Continuing its growth in traffic, connectivity, and complexity, the current Internet is full of applications with rapidly changing characteristics."

Overall, CAIDA has found that traffic on the internet continues to grow,  which is not adequately represented by the two- dimensional graph CISCO and WIRED depicted. Growth does accurately reflect the transition and growing emergence of traffic off the world wide web and into  alternative internet based transmission paths (e.g. mobile based and other applications that allow real time streaming).  

This same transition mimics strategies used by effective  marketers who link the brand messages and campaigns across  multiple media platforms.  Key words provide the bridge. The more consistent their use across the growing number of media platforms,  the more certain an organization's promotion efforts will  intersect key consumer touch points on or offline.   Ideally, consumers pick up these same key words  and carry them across other natural communication channels, further enhancing the brand's reputation and in theory  increasing sales.

If your business is selling Search Engine Optimization (SEO) this emphasis on key words appears  great for business. It's not however where a capable marketing strategy should invest the majority of its budget.  Not merely because there is some danger to pursuing this strategy (see the The dirty little secrets of search in last week's New York Times); but the greater, more complex objective is reputation management and not key word optimization.  

 Historically, brand owners/creators controlled media messaging and placement.  To successfully sell, you "paid" for the privilege of being placed in front of consumers walking through the yellow pages or by a billboard, listening over radio/TV  or their eyeballs scanning newspaper or specialty publications. Product packaging, placement and promotion  are often  budgeted separately and only occasionally linked for a "special" promotion (e.g. cause marketing or a contest).  The rise of the world wide web, added the category of "owned" media to the marketing mix and budgets had to cover the cost of website development, content writers and traffic analysis, including SEO.  With Social Media, a third area– "earned" warrants increasing budget and management attention to monitor the customer-created channels and chatter of your brand enthusiasts  as well as brand detractors. (see complete description in Branding in the Digital Age by David Edelman). 

 The Edelman article's case study of a TV manufacturer across one touch point within the wider consumer decision journey proves far more  instructive than my earlier reference to the Old Spice ad and its multi-channel focus. 

"A costly disruption of the journey across the category made clear that the company’s new marketing strategy had to deliver an integrated experience from consider to buy and beyond . In fact, because the problem was common to the entire category, addressing it might create competitive advantage."    

Unlike Old Spice, the manufacturer opted to shift the marketing emphasis away from paid media.  Focusing on owned and earned media seems to enhance the effectiveness of their key words and multi-channel linkages, and engage traffic where it mattered most at the buy, and enjoy, advocacy, bond  touch points. This is not a prescription for all brands, but the case is instructive in identifying the disconnects and deficiencies in common web based strategies, or even of marketing extravaganzas disconnected from the ongoing conversations that are circling your business, product and/or brand.

Whether or not you belief in Chris Anderson's prognosis about the death  of the Web or buy into David Edelman's Consumer Decision Journey research, few organizations appear to have fully leveraged these changes.  Increasingly, an ability to execute and efficiently allocate resources to address the demands presented by the growing number of communication channels  will  distinguish successful companies from their competitors.  The changes create more opportunities for strategy to take a more commanding role in managing and driving the combined efforts, either internally or with the help of outside specialty firms.

Additonal Discussion Take Aways

  • Social networks are informative, free sources of intelligence that naturally build out and generate mutual trust and benefits to buyers and sellers. 
  • The role of the marketer is merely to influence and no longer the producer/director of the brand experience.
  • The responsibility for marketing  is changing and increasingly is upending internal role limitations  and requiring participation from unlikely sources e.g. corporate governance, communication standards and guidelines.  Employees share roles with customers and the more acquainted with internal policies, strategies and planning the more they can aide and assist in  wider message consistency. 
  • Authenticity has become ever more important.
  • Fluidity and increasing knowledge of terminology around the digital communications space is a valuable skills set…not just for marketers and IT folks. 
  • As reputation management rises and people do business more and more with the people that they know,  is there anything really being created of value, and are other marketing and sales efforts as necessary?
  • How do these lessons translate or enhance B2B sales? 
  • It's not the web vs. the internet differentiation that matters, as much as recognizing how one innovation(social media)  has brought into focus an array of  deficiencies and gaps within an organization (marketing departments) as well as an industry (e.g. advertising) The challenge is how to best integrate the old with the new. 
  • In the end, the prescription to know your customer before creating your strategy remains the first and foremost lesson. Knowing what your customer wants will always be helpful but successful business requires more.
  • True differentiation in products being marketed remain beneficial but the emphasis should be toward innovation in developing products. 
  • Important to remember the shape of the adoption curves with new technology and Chris Anderson's point that new doesn't replace old. New merely creates more table space to accommodate more preferences.  The challenge is the frequency we change, resort and revisit our marketing activities and resource priorities. 
  • Both  articles confirm the importance of social media and keeping up with changing technologies.  They also call attention to the  the challenges organizations  face in trying to bring them together  to create successful communities around their products and/or brands.

 

Any added thoughts, perspectives or cases are welcome.

Added citations

Edelman makes some of the same points in this article:

Four ways to get more value from digital marketing

By David C. Edelman, McKinsey Quarterly, March 2010

https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Four_ways_to_get_more_value_from_digital_marketing_2556

 

Trust Agents, Using the web to build Influence    by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith

NOW Revolution, 7 shifts to make your business faster   by Jay Baer and Amber Naslund

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5 thoughts on “Is it Too Late for a Web Strategy?

  1. Thanks for posting these notes. I miss being able to participate in the discussions now that I live in Colorado.

    1. Thanks for stopping by and encouragement for me to keep synthesizing and publishing information others find valuable too! Hope you will become a regular visitor.

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