Management 2.0–can you shift? Top 50 Overall Rank Company Innovation

In 2011, among 673 companies from 32 countries, Apple topped the list as most admired and respected by both industry peers and overall.  CNN’s Money magazine  survey used several criteria to compute an overall ranking and then shared on a single criterion those companies who made the top ten spots.  A composite summary appears below.  Surprisingly, no company ranked consistently across all criteria –not even Apple who ranked #1 only on innovation.

Top 50 Overall Rank Company Innovation Global Competi-tiveness People management Mangement Quality Long Term Invest-ment Quality of Products/Services Financial Soundness Social Res-ponsibility

25

Goldman Sachs Group

1

1

Apple

2

7

10

4

2

14

Walt Disney

6

3

3

7

10

3

2

Google

9

2

4

1

2

1

24

Nike

2

4

5

9

9

6

31

Nestle

3

3

7

8

9

7

8

7

Amazon. com

4

8

6

4

1

3

10

McDonald’s

1

1

2

12

IBM

8

49

Accenture

9

9

9

5

Procter & Gamble

9

15

3M

6

3

Berkshire Hathaway

4

Southwest Airlines

6

Coca-Cola

8

FedEx

9

Microsoft
N.A. Royal Dutch Shell

6

Nike, Google,Walt Disney and Amazon have similar rock star status.  But the failure of many of  the remaining companies to even make the top ten on other categories, or the inconsistency of the company rankings  is a bit confusing.

If analysts and directors evaluate companies using different criteria , which criteria should management prioritize?

The best case for management 2.0.

Imperfect an instrument as surveys of  directors, industry peers and analyst rankings of companies may be, the disconnects between perception and management is unsettling.

Perhaps, the problem is complexity itself. Siloed, hierarchical , central, command-control decision-making  styled organizations struggle to keep up.  As the world moves faster, successful business outcomes require simultaneous attention to multiple interdependent factors. Consistency in your approach across your markets may prove disastrous.

In compiling the chart above, I initially focused on three indicators:  people management aka Talent; overall management quality; and innovation.  The diversity of companies across these criteria rankings lend credence to the rallying cry to change existing talent and management approaches.  Traditional, internal organizational frameworks or operating design warrant alignment on more than these three factors.   Gary Hamel, long down this path, wrote The Future of management in 2007; and often describes traditional management practices as obsolete, calling for revolution within the ranks. More pertinent, values alignment do not seem to be a priority.  After all why would any organization undergo a major cultural transformation for the sake of upping this score?

Remember Total Quality Management, or the movement to adopt Six sigma cultures?   Though well-intentioned, both turned out to be somewhat of a passing fad, the impetus for effective and efficient operations did  lower bottom line costs, but the residual streamline approach undercut the very capability for resilience necessary to succeed in the current global, rapidly competitive environment.

More contemporary buzzwords rippling through the management literature continuously call for new adjustments, and a shift in style to accompany if not better accommodate technology changes. Simplifying access and transmission of multiple media, aka  web2.0. may indeed require a different management approach.  What  exactly are we describing?  Apart from branding , a series of  common threads unite the work of three thought leaders.

Ron Heifetz describes The Practice of Adaptive Leadership (2009), its associated risks, and why our attachment to authoritative leadership needs rebooting. Gary Hamel’s book, Leading the Revolution (2002) explored ways to reinvent business models in light of the dot-com technology bubble; his more recent title is The Future of Management (2007).  The monthly strategy discussion readings (links at the bottom of this post) also included the insights of Bob Thomas, author of Crucibles of Leadership (2008), from  Accenture’s Institute of High Performing Leadership.

All of these thought leaders describe  embracing unconventional thinking, full transparency, initiative, experimentation, learning from experience or basically creating adaptive cultures. Sounds a little like innovation doesn’t it?

What about the social media factor?

Coincident on the day the monthly strategy discussion met to review these authors theses on management,  the Chicago Booth Annual Management Conference keynote panel focused on the most visible evidence of these shifts– “The economics of Social Media.”  In 2011, it’s impossible to be in business and not be inundated with headlines about Linked In’s public offering,  Facebook’s 600 million and counting users, or Twitter’s 200 million strong.  Of course these are just a few of the applications business must evaluate, not so much to buy, but to watch, listen and learn to respond to many stakeholders associated with their enterprise.

The shift  of control over your brand and business between stakeholders and business leaders and managers is close to parity.  If web2.0, or social media is the people’s network where they can transact, share, express and discover–Business has to be present, flexible and responsive 24/7.  if you had doubts, now you know why Management 2.0 is critical to an organization’s survival.

Social media’s ubiquity challenges the most traditional organizations and their decision-making hierarchy.  Customer facing roles increase risk, especially if  individuals are scripted or their flexibility to act and access to information is  limited by the system.  The parameters around interaction, once  engineered to reduce costs and maximize returns, need adjusting and consider  indirect factors. Typically, an organization expects customer service to buffer or clean up  “messy” or “problem” concerns from the public.  The focus measure is efficiency–avg handle time and the number of calls/hour.  Management did not track the quality or effectiveness of the interaction in the unit performance report. The push for further labor savings resulted in outsourcing and offshoring these units, adoption of automated voice response systems or encouraging online users to check out the FAQ section of a website before contacting support.  Sure, customer satisfaction and customer relationship systems are  important, but the breadth of possible outbound responses remain tightly controlled.  In the same manner that marketing and PR  manage the company message and often write the release printed by limited media outlets.

Integrating Web2.0 and the interaction tracking within the operation exemplify internal innovations or managerial adaptation, right? Management learned to take advantage of technology to lower its delivery costs and use CRM systems to learn about the customer and track transaction behavior.  All signs of adaptation. But do they go far enough?

Back to the Future

Facebook launched in 2004 and quickly spread to all university campuses and entered some corporations, opening to any user in 2006 and quickly became the 7th most trafficked website.

In 2007, social media is not even mentioned in what   Businessweek described as attributes of the worlds most innovative companies:

The leaders of companies on this year’s BusinessWeek-BCG list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies recognize that developing breakthrough products, revamping operational processes, and coming up with new business models doesn’t happen overnight. Instead of relying on gimmicks or incremental line extensions, they’re working to build organizations that are capable of sustained innovation. They understand that requires taking risks and investing for the long-term. And they focus on the things that really matter, such as hiring the most talented employees and providing them with the environment they need to thrive.

…Getting people to step out of their comfort zones can do a lot to spark new ideas. But if they’re not paired with more fundamental changes, all those efforts will go nowhere. Fortunately, some companies have been waking up to that fact…. the proper care and feeding of employees in creative cultures takes much more than training. …best companies seem to be managing a balance of a few high-profile programs aimed at getting employees to think differently and more fundamental processes that make sure the work actually gets done.

Of the top 10 companies (Apple, Google, Toyota, GE, Microsoft, P&G, 3M, Walt Disney Co., IBM and Sony) 3M had dropped to 7 from 3rd in 2006, while Walt Disney had catapulted from 43 in 2006 to #8.  Surprised?

We compared these messages and found them to  echo some of the authors’ admonishment of the management 2.0 revolution.

Marching orders for Management 2.0 Advocates

Note: The original article citations are found below.

Gary  Hamel talks about inspiring and changing the environment, aggregating human capabilities toward the collective and mentions three big organizational challenges:

  1. Adaptability–how to build self-transforming organizations
  2. Innovation–mobilizing imagination
  3. Engagement–on both the emotional and intellectual so people bring all of their capabilities to their work.

Ron Heifetz talks about adaptive leadership means changing the way people do business in many places in the organization.  In other words, innovation isn’t just for marketing.  Leadership has to orchestrate the connections between the possible, or the abstract strategic imperative and the tactical or working level.  The question is not merely whether to  establish accountability; but how to  help all levels of the organization challenge and push the frontier of their current constructed environment and create room for experimentation, where people are free to make mistakes and learn.

Finally, Bob Thomas suggests that experience has to be turned into leadership capabilities and focus on the ability to learn lessons.  Provide the  imperative around durable processes in three facets of learning:

  1. Prepare — how do/could we frame the problem, understand how we learn and focus on accelerating the possibility to learn
  2. Deploy–activate our sense-making skills, emotional IQ, story telling, practice with  multiple decision-making and leadership styles to close the gap between theory and practice.  (Heifetz expresses the gap as the difference between knowing and abstraction).
  3. Renew–Points of view are teachable as well as adaptive.  Managers should build and exercise their own advice networks.

Sounds easy right? The 2007 article profiled GE, Disney, IBM and Boeing.  By 2011,  the companies rated by their industry peers and then overall only identified Google, Apple and only the Walt Disney company made the top 10 list.

Articles featured in the monthly Discussion

Ron Heifetz

1. Adaptive Leadership

 2. The Interview Adaptive Leadership

Gary Hamel

Can’t Innovate? It’s Management’s Fault (Really!)

Inventing Management 2.0

Bob Thomas

Turning Experience into Leadership

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7 thoughts on “Management 2.0–can you shift? Top 50 Overall Rank Company Innovation

    1. Thanks Elvis, appreciate the read and the review! Not an easy task, requires a lot of time and effort but all worth it!
      hope you keep reading!
      Rachel

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