Possibility, are you asking how or what?

Polarity, the idea of opposites, turns thoughts and possibilities around like  a pendulum  always moving from one extreme to the other. That is until the thought runs out of energy or momentum and stops. It rests until some force displaces it.

Recently, a client asked for help explaining the difference between planning for a transition and planning a transformation. Since Transformation seems to be one of the buzz words of the moment, I began to wonder what made the two thinking processes different, and what did they really mean. My polarity thinking friend suggested that transitions plan for certainty, or near certainty and transformation plan for uncertainty.  I disagreed.

I think of a transition as the pause between takes, what happens between two clearly defined states.  It’s when we assess, evaluate or figure out our position, how close or far. Transformation, that’s the feeling we have on arrival, we made it so now what.

In other words, if the client has a clear objective as in to take a specific distant hill, then transition plans incorporate the certainty that elevations will be changing on route and insures the team’s prepared for the journey. When it knows  what changes to expect along the way, then it’s transition ready. Transformation focuses on arrival, different conditions and challenges it doesn’t know, but can imagine arrival makes possible.  After all, isn’t that why the objective was to take the hill?  Wasn’t it about the advantage that being on top offers?

Put another way, imagine what you want to do is known, like traveling to another location.  Transitions focus on the journey, how long will it take, buying tickets or planning the route. Transformation planning asks how the change in location affects your current activities.  Transitions are more whole body time shifts, where as transformation puts your head in the future while the rest of your physical body remains grounded in the present.

November’s topic for the monthly strategy discussion focused on Transformation Readiness. Before I managed to summarize the conversation and post notes,news about the sale of Mariano’s to Kroger caught my eye. and then I also spotted  an interview with CEO, Bob Mariano on the Chicago Booth website.

If you are not familiar with Chicago, then let me explain that Mariano’s was a new entry into the grocery store business. By coincident, just as they had opened a few stores one of Chicago’s main competitors –Safeway decided to close all of its Dominick’s stores. This meant Mariano’s acquired 10 of the closed stores and their debt fueled expansion took off.  That’s when Kroger came calling.

Since I had already been thinking about  transformation questions , as in how do you get transformation ready, I thought it worth sharing these responses.  Take a peek, and let me know what you think, are the example transitions or evidence of transformation readiness?

Scenario A: I think that Mariano’s namesake, CEO and founder, Bob nailed it when he said:

“At Mariano’s, we tried to push further. We continue to push.  What I mean by push is to expose the customer to different and unique things and allow them the opportunity to tell you, ‘No, I don’t like that,’ or ‘Yes, I like that.’”

Scenario B: Or maybe you prefer the spin by CEO of Shazam when asked about the increasing gap between growth in the amount of information and its utilization. ” …How do you improve data intelligence?”

“That’s definitely the case [that there is a data knowledge gap] and for years we have been talking about data warehousing, or capturing that data, but turning information into data intelligence is a new journey for many companies…”

Or, how about the Gambling industry insiders view who characterizes difference between digitizing or converting your industry to the reality post conversion this way:

Advancements in technology has brought about a rapid digitization of gambling and almost every other industry. Some have managed to exploit these developments more than others and I think that the gambling industry is at the forefront of how well technology can be applied to a domain.

As an industry we must be open to change and pro-actively look at how we can exploit such technologies to provide a better and more entertaining experience to our customers. For example, the progress in Touch ID has enabled us to allow LeoVegas iPhone app customers to log in to the casino using only their fingerprint.

Are you wondering why distinguishing between transitions and transformations matter? Or, even better, how your business can take greater advantage of the widespread availability, access and flexibility that a fully digitized world creates?

Great, now you are thinking strategically.

How Old Metrics may strand you strategically

Ever stIMG_0267op to consider how the ever present changes going on around you make your own transformation easier?

John Hagel relatively recent blog post describes the opposite.

In a world of accelerating change, one of our greatest imperatives is to “unlearn” – to challenge and ultimately abandon some of our most basic beliefs about how the world works and what is required for success.

Accenture a few years ago noticed that many different companies had shifted their approach to strategy. Perhaps, the availability of cheap, powerful computing capacity and Big Data are responsible for driving changes in strategy development as more organizations using technology find it easier to build consideration of the future into their present planning.   Hagel, a long time fan of scenario planning would applaud these efforts too.

With the rise of automated business processes, analytics too get incorporated automatically to enhance decision making and may be simultaneously compromising management capabilities to internalize all of these changes or understand the underlying dynamics traditional measures mask. Several articles provided case studies in different industries provided the basis of discussion around transformation (see the bottom of the post for specific article links).

how to lie with staticsSuccessful organizations rely on their strategy to put forward action plans, realize new ideas while averting risk. Statesmen and management alike find themselves in precarious places when they assume a trend will continue without change. Many statistical methods and decision-makers use of data remain unchanged from 1954 when Daniel Huff first published How to Lie with Statistics. His timeless book describes very simply the perils of improper use of methods that were designed to capture and explain if not contextualize the significance of singular observations, or data.   The current transformations enabled by technology have done more to alter behavior than organizations seem to recognize. That’s the path our discussion took.

The capability for insight

Prospective vs retrospective cohort analysis  and data mining techniques are far from new. Though the volume and speed of available data to digest and process with ever The increasingly sophisticated tools and the ease with which volume and speed of available can be processed may help as well as hinder their digestion. Sure the time to test alternative scenarios may be faster, but how do you choose the model?

Do you begin with the intended outcome? The scientific method and numerous models from multiple disciplines make it possible to isolate factors, determine their significance, and estimate alternative scenarios and assess how these variations produce changes in impact.

Similarly, the cross pollination of data modeling from one discipline into multiple industries and use cases continue to shift management beliefs regarding the importance of specific factors and interactions in their processes. The perennial blind spot denies many organizations and their leadership the insight necessary to transform both their internal strategic thinking process and business operating models. Last month’s discussion of McDonald’s and Coca-Cola illustrated how easily leadership misinterpreted fluctuating performance as temporal issues versus recognizing structural factors. It’s one thing to balance efficiency and effectiveness, quality and satisfaction and another to manage awareness of change and insights necessary to your continued survival.

What else thinking

“…both the digital world and the physical one are indispensable parts of life and of business. The real transformation taking place today isn’t the replacement of the one by the other, it’s the marriage of the two into combinations that create wholly new sources of value.  “

The sudden availability of online data tracking provided many organizations with the proper capability to understand user behavior differently. A whole new industry arose to focus on interpretation while creating of new measures while also introducing new thinking about effectiveness in sales, customer service, training etc.  Metrics, once created to prove out a strategy or an idea, now leave many organizations vulnerable until they build up the capacity to understand this new thinking let alone make corresponding operational changes necessary to sustain their business.

This is not the story of companies who fail to adapt such as Kodak who invented digital cameras only to retain their focus on film; but maybe it is.

http://www.cognoise.com/index.php?topic=17598.0Computerized reporting dashboards summarize specific indicators or activity associated with managing process or business relevant factors. The time and reporting cost savings that result from the automatic generation and ready access to information by managers and executives reinforce existing thinking and leave little room for understanding wider changes that may be impacting their business. It wasn’t long ago that analysts, and teams of them, spent their entire day pulling data and then calculating critical statistics detailing the effectiveness and efficiency of organizational activities to create reports for senior management. These efforts also made them accountable by insuring the data was clean, verifying whether outliers were real or indicative of a model failing to fully capture the wider dynamics. I was once one of those managers.  Today, automated reporting has eliminated many of the people capable of deeper data exploration and who chose what data, which statistics and the context necessary to understand the situation. The second problem is that data shared graphically or in tables never tell the whole story, though infographics do try.

A good analyst is taught to review the data and results, double-check whether the model or calculated results makes sense. Sure managers and executives may be quicker to detect aberrations and then raise questions but , how many of them have the time, patience or skills to test their ideas or intuitions? I imagine very few if any. Where are these available resources and how widely known are they to questioning executives?   How might the dashboard provide additional information to help frame the results executives see as they too seek to understand or make sense of the results?

Outside in thinking

Established data flow processes and automated reporting do deliver great advantages but they may also explain why outsiders find it easier than insiders to create new business models.   Where’s the out of the box thinking? And how can different data help?

Sure, it’s easy to blame regulatory requirements or compensation structures incentivized to focus on effectiveness and efficiency that leave little latitude to notice opportunity. For example, in the airline industry route fares were once set by regulations. The minimum fares were intended to cover airlines operating expenses that both insured passenger safety and access to air travel in more locations where market forces may lead airlines to cut corners. Deregulation may have given airlines additional freedom but many manage their business using the same metrics that they report to the Department of Transportation. Likewise in Healthcare, the imposition of new regulatory requirements came with new metrics that forced hospitals to focus on patient outcomes not just their costs.

When executives bottom line focus limits their thinking as an exercise in how making corrections in operation may maximize that number they overlook other contexts. Data quality issues should surface quickly in most organizations, but what if another factor created the data issue? A misplaced data point, or inconsistent treatment of the content of a data field rarely explain all aberrations in the results.   Weather, for example exemplifies a ubiquitous, exogenous variable. Observable data fluctuations may be directly or indirectly responsible by affecting other more directly connected factors, such as a snowstorms that change people’s activity plans. I’m not familiar with any automated reporting system that will automatically create a footnote to the data point associated with the arrival of a snowstorm. The reviewer is forced to remember or manually if possible add the footnote for others.

Bigger transformations to come

Bain believes there are significant implications for every organization that result from this digital and physical combination of innovations , they call Digical. It’s not easy to keep up with the corresponding behavioral shifts that result from these rapidly changing technological capabilities.

Focusing exclusively on efficiency and cost data helped management measure impact in the old era, though still necessary today they may no longer suffice. Do you know how social behaviors of your customers impact your bottom line? The technologies to support your business, such as your website or your cash register misses out on the social behaviors evident on sites like Facebook, Twitter, Yelp or even their bank. Mapping the ecosystem and then aligning the digital tracking data can now be supplemented with sensor data that may be anonymous to specific customers but can inform movement and actions relevant to your engagement.http://intronetworks.com/making-amazing-connections-siggraph-asia/

Naturally, as mentioned earlier bias plays a role in our inability to notice the significance of new data. The more we automate and configure systems to measure what we always knew mattered, the less likely we are to be able to recognize new data and its significance. What should you the analyst and you the executive do to counteract these factors?

Takeaways

Monitor the activity of smaller companies as they experiment to learn what’s most relevant.

Don’t make assumptions, exercise strategic intentions to become more open receptive and curious about anomalies and be more creativity and persistent in identifying the drivers or possible factors.

Historically, metrics were an output designed to assess the validity of your strategy –did it work and/or deliver value. Not it’s time for strategic thinking to view metrics as an input. The use of statistics enabling analysis tools partnered with business knowledge and acumen must be part of communicating to higher levels in the business.

Often we measure the wrong things because the incentives are misaligned. Am I paid based on my proven ability to produce widgets at specific levels , or to produce effective, sustainable results for the business, not just my business unit?

Computers are useless they can only give you answers. For strategy, validating the questions may be important but so too is taking the time and effort needed to determine even better questions.

ARTICLES

Alternative case examples

Bain’s study and understanding of the state of “digical” transformation:
http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/leading-a-digical-transformation.aspx#sidebar
Fast Food
http://www.qsrmagazine.com/reports/drive-thru-performance-study-2014
Wireless
http://www.rcrwireless.com/20140812/opinion/reality-check-new-metrics-for-a-changing-industry-tag10
Television
http://fortune.com/2014/10/23/adobe-nielsen-tv-ratings-system/
Gaming
http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2014-03-10-social-currency-has-real-value

Innovation –from the inside out

Innovation, in principle, is one sure path to organic business growth.  At the least, innovation may buy your organization  market advantage.  At its best, depending on how successful and deeply your innovation initiative cuts into your organization,  a  new growth engine/platform  may emerge and propel you into a  market leadership post.

Most businesses and their executives recognize  the value proposition innovation presents and are equally wise to the risks and potential waste of resources that naturally occur with pursuing the unknown.  Perhaps the risks weigh more heavily than the promise and so  few organizations take on breakthrough innovation as a strategy to organic growth. In June, after reviewing in advance the closest thing we could find to insider perspectives on the topic (see What we Read below), a group of strategy minded professionals sat to understand why innovation is the road not taken.

Seeding Innovation

More than the idea, success through innovation, whether incremental or radical, signifies a progressive, learning culture and mindset.   Organizations capable of  realizing returns on innovation posess the leadership capacity to commit time and resources sufficient to the task.  An ability to generate ideas or brainstorm is often not the barrier to innovation, nor is  creativity absent within their culture.  The challenge that stops innovation is leadership’s ability to fully support  both   emergent ideas and the  process related resources to further develop, test and/or pilot the ideas across a range of opportunities.  Conscious dedication of resources to experimentation, managing intangibles, such as the ambiguous  requirements that foster creativity are unnatural for a firm whose play book focuses on the usual,  practical financial management imperatives.  In other words, flexibly allocated resources does little to diminish risk, but it can increase inefficiency.  Getting leadership to understand and accept innovation’s  promise of a greater payback may help offset added risk  perceptions; but, the allure of predictable, repeatable performance that comes from persisting in current process, service and production is very comforting.  A  leadership team  that relies on traditional up front proof and projections drawn from historical certainty and experience  often are less successful at achieving growth through innovation.

More to the point,  potential or proven rewards established  in one setting rarely survive transplant  into another setting and thus fail to get the green light, as the known risks of existing business as usual prove far more palatable.

Booz-Allen global health practice authors of The missing link,  look at several opportunities available to middle management to acquire experience in managing the unknown risks, a topic we happened to discuss last month.  (check out Management 2.0–new learning requirements and Top 50 innovation companies). Open innovation, these authors suggest, necessitates more than one problem solving approach; and preferably encourages contributions from multiple levels of the organization.  This works particularly well when executive leadership awards  middle management  opportunity to develop critical thinking skills.

Principals of Strategyn, an innovation firm, explain innovation in problem solving terms akin to “mapping the job a customer is trying to get done.” May 2008 article for HBR  Their eight step approach helps firms discover opportunities for breakthrough products and servicesThrough insights, firms discover  how to source, refine,  even test and improve upon an idea. In breaking down the steps, and creating a process for innovation the authors put innovation on a level playing field with any other initiative.  This further paves the way for management to create and support  a conducive orientation around execution.

The Fast Company profile of  McDonald’s Denis Weil offered the most realistic view of what makes innovation possible within a highly centralized efficient organization.  The story outlines the intensive prototyping and testing behind a longer term strategy effort now in its final phase..the restaurant redesign in the US.  Separating  Weil’s innovation unit from central management headquarters is consistent with  McDonald’s efficiency across all aspects of its management.  The rigor and systematic approach Weil follows in testing and experimentation of his concepts perfects and works out all the bumps in the process before rolling out changes across the organization.

Finally  Tony Schwartz, writing for HBR, offers  six prescriptives on the culture of innovation. This last article  rounds out innovation’s challenges and focuses on what an organization needs to realize innovation.

In all cases, organizations and their leadership must  clearly understand their strengths, capabilities and be honest about their reflection mirrored by  the marketplace.

Certainly time, freedom and resources are critical to realizing any change –all ideas echoed in one form or another in the readings.  More powerfully,  an organization’s culture  will either make or break their opportunity to realize the benefits of innovation.  In many examples and  across multiple sectors, few cultures have the comfort, confidence and or strengths to ride the waves of uncertainty that is at the core of successful innovation.

Barriers to overcome

The barriers that often prevent any change from succeeding in an organization, or a wonderful strategy from being realized, are the same things that impede innovation success. In short they include:

1.  Culture–There’s no escaping culture.  Those who find innovation most challenging are often top down, practical organizations  who are risk averse, and  demand high level  accountability  on standard financial performance metrics.

2. Leadership –Innovation doesn’t stand a chance where the decision-process values competency and cash flow , ROI principles and uniformity–e.g. the story of the Peacock whose colorful style, creative agenda  was ultimately forced to wear the Penguin suit.

3. Pressures that eradicate  creative tensions between organization and operations management means also result in  lost opportunities to champion new and lasting solutions to system problems that naturally re-emerge due to growth.

Takeaways by participants

Can an outside consultant or an internal manager tasked with introducing innovation persuade leadership to commit to changes, aspects  that need  refocus or redefinition of their culture?  In spite of the obvious struggle to compete and the opportunity that innovation provides, the practical challenges often prevent a CEO from taking on the task.

  • The simple prescriptive are far from realistic.  Like change, innovation is very challenging to plan let alone create a date certain for success.
  • In every organization, people capable of innovation exist, the challenge is to give them the space and funding.
  • Companies known for innovation are more fun because when your ideas are heard and there’s a general openness or receptivity there’s greater freedom to think, and that is fun!
  • Of course, the financial services industry had so much fun, that we are all still recovering from it.
  • The choice isn’t limited to whether to undertake innovation internally vs outsource, either way your culture may sabotage the advantages.  For example, the appetite for technology start-ups that Google, Microsoft Cisco and other technology firms created by their respective growth strategies  also show the seemingly insurmountable challenge to satisfy the markets expectations of financial performance.
  • Align innovation around lead-users will naturally embed the opportunity for innovation into the organization as long as HR governance and policies encourage it.
  • Sounds simple enough–  hire and change the Innovation quota (IQ), just be sure you don’t hire for yesterday’s company but for tomorrow…therein lies the challenge.
  • The more innovation  associated to your core business the better off you are to engage in the activity internally, as McDonald’s long-term efforts to overcome their branding issue, which was comprehensive and changes critical to the future of the business.
  • Skunk works always an option, the more independence and freedom they have from the traditional organization the more likely they are to succeed.
  • When it comes to vision formation and innovation, the question for leadership is not  “which way should I go? ”  but, “Where do we want to end up? ” If you don’t know it doesn’t matter.

By no means did we exhaust this topic and in preparing the blog post I found the  innovation practice map shown below.  The Economist also had a post on this topic that I’m sorry we missed earlier entitled: The innovation Machine   in which I hope might inspire a little more active commentary.  Don’t be shy, All comments and ideas are welcome

Skunk Works practice map
Thoughts on R & D see: http://valueshepherd.com/commentary/archaeology_skunk_works/archaeology_skunk_works.htm

What we Read

The missing link in innovative research

http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00077?pg=all

Customer Centered Innovation Map (HBR May 2008)

http://www.jey-associates.com/pr/Customer-CenteredInnovationMap_R0805Hp2.pdf

Making over McDonald’s  (FastCompany  August 2010)

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/149/super-style-me.html

Six Secrets to Creating a Culture of Innovation, August 10, 2010—HBR Blog by Tony Schwartz,  http://s.hbr.org/cocWIA

Management 2.0–new learning requirements

Learning – requirement or a pre-requisite?

Yes, this is the right place. The notes from the May discussion on  Management 2.0  are indeed here. In my work as an independent strategy consultant, my first rule is to listen and observe.  I need to transform what I’m being told and reconcile it with what I’m observing.  The norms or environmental conditions within an organization often give the first clues about what holds them back.  It’s rare that I meet people within the organization who haven’t figured out what’s wrong, or maybe even what needs to be done.  Often the monthly strategy discussions take o the same paradox.  The articles are sensible or seem to suggest the obvious but doing is much harder than it looks.

The process of writing up the notes from the monthly strategy discussion struck me as a classic exercise in management 1.0. The summary of what happened, the points discussed, conclusions reached and the infamous next steps are generally recorded and distributed. The minutes function primarily to keep everyone’s focus on the same play book, and put into wider distribution clear summaries of collective thinking. Given the strategic management practices and issues group discussion’s intention, I’m skeptical that collective thinking is the sensible approach.  

As the frequent facilitator of the discussion, I seek to elicit deeper connections to the articles.  Volunteering to  simultaneously take and write-up the discussion is an interesting challenge. So I’ve opted to skip the  loyal regurgitation of the bulk or the gist of the ideas that flow. Besides, it’s  impossible to capture the real flow of ideas, as they filter though my own thoughts and conceptions of the material and equally impossible to note comment and the questioning , outrage, delight or even surety of a comment’s inflection. In blogging, the scribbled notes come to life but also unconsciously reconnect the circling back conversation in a different sequence. For example, when the conversation on one sub topic takes a twist only to later come back to that sub topic, I naturally try to connect the book-ended remarks and extract the distraction.

 Why does all this process talk matter? It relates to how we, as humans naturally work.  Reflection, when actively invoked, naturally evokes new thoughts and new learning. These blog posts try to share the self-reported learning captured in my notes, but they also do something else. They are my attempt to capture the continued learning on the topic that happens in my ongoing interactions. In these posts I take the opportunity to try to share my new understanding of the topic, or insights into a given position’s advocacy.  For example, this past month I wonder why a group, primarily comprising mid to late-career Chicago trained MBAs, find solace in the verity of finance while the idea of management 2.0 remains a bit fuzzy?

Thoughts on Management 2.0

That said, time to share the discussion notes that I have indeed struggled to bring alive. (Find additional learning  in the next post  entitled Management 2.0–can you shift)
Notes or recorded observations and reactions from discussion participants to the articles and topic entitled Management 2.0.

Adaptable , innovation style cultures, aka management 2.0 have long been advocated and these principles characterized by three key academics who study Leadership*. Largely prescriptive,  discussion participants had no question that managers should follow this advice. The paradox however lies in reconciling a culture bent on innovation with obligations to support the existing business model—, the one generating returns and is the source, if not majority basis of compensation. In a lean environment, it becomes more challenging to find the time and energy to innovate. Cost cutting for many firms in the recent downturn led to the innovation group being sacked and outsourced. In some cases, operating strategy groups followed the same route.

Regardless of whether the firm chooses situational strategy or an adaptive strategy, an inherent conflict in the self-preservation of the organization naturally ensues. The management philosophy and tone of the CEO generally dictates the culture but does not necessarily lead to pervasive behavior. After all if the average lifespan of a CEO is a few years, it’s hard for the organization to have fully integrated a particular CEO’s philosophy within their culture.

Effectively communicating  financial goals makes it easier to balance the respective balcony and dance floor perspectives. Numbers make things tangible, and connect actions to overall changes in the balance sheet. Connecting people, their responsibilities as well as opportunities, to the components that deliver EBITDA the better chance at achieving overall performance

Adaptive management means adapting your customers too, helping them to understand the changes being tried and the positive impact on them. In a manufacturing firm, making changes that tweak the system or fine tune the results are easier than in a service firm where the resources are primarily labor

Management 2.0 conceptually still a little fuzzy. Sounds like and may even look a little like an innovation culture, but is it? Can one create a culture that values innovation and risk-taking that doesn’t cost you your career?

Easy to understand preponderance of management 2.0 in small start-up companies. Being nimble, fewer layers of management also mean fewer chances to mix-up signals. Turnaround specialists typically find that small companies have a larger disconnect with finance.. letting ideas get ahead of prudent financial management.   All investments need to generate payback and understanding the firm’s cash flow parameters is critical.

Finance often has a second role, facilitating a strategy’s execution.  If day-to-day operations and management face the disconnect between ideas and cashflow, where can they get the clear support needed?  Is it only executive management’s responsibility to reconcile the balcony perspectives and incentives around a culture of innovation and the realities of the positions of dance floor management or dancer  struggling to meet a variety of standards and goals? Understanding the timing and relationship of unbounded customer service handle times with future customer receipts due to customer satisfaction is challenging for everyone. In a small business, there’s more transparency, as in everyone knows the good customers by name.
Measured latitude is the language used by 3M’s historic approach that requires everyone to spend and account for a small proportion of their time to learn something new. Rather than hiring clones, even in the face of the current environment where fewer resources do more, adaptive organizations  hire alternative experiences to broaden their internal learning. Innovation, when under-financed, can bring a well-managed company to its knees; EBITDA is real and important contributor to your business survival.

Inspiration doesn’t happen predictably on a timeline ; but the culture 3M instilled ties innovation to compensation.  Don’t underestimate the power of a good story to inspire and in grain experimental cultures.. The failed glue  gave rise to the Post-It Note encourages people to experiment,  and learn from failures. It also helps get everyone from top to bottom in an organization to pull the same way.

Getting the commitment from the top down, in larger organizations differentiate successful transmission of this innovation or looser adaptive culture that works well in smaller organizations. A CEO’s daily voice mail is inspiring, but a collaborative commitment in which staff concerns and worries are both heard and effort concerted  to work them through goes that much farther. . This is the suggestion that Ron Heifetz describes in adaptive leadership.

Alternatively, an organization can step their way up to change by giving staff assignments outside their normal duty. Having the tools and putting out the thinking is not the same as the heavy workout of the issues or obstacles. How much do client comments impact an employee’s compensation? When training, the indirect rewards are insufficient, the short-term pressures means it may delay getting long-term results.In the end, management still has to be serious, committed and clearly express what results they want and when.
An organization’s culture bred on innovation are willing to experiment, routinely challenge norms, share knowledge and use measurement and scorecards to track progress.

The existence of an innovation culture, not clear evidence of management 2.0?

More learnings will follow, and I invite all readers to challenge those listed or add their own.  This is a great place to test and try out ideas.  I hope you will continue the conversation.

*If you are looking for the articles and references that were the basis of the May discussion see the next post for a complete listing and links.