Possibility, are you asking how or what?

Polarity, the idea of opposites, turns thoughts and possibilities around like  a pendulum  always moving from one extreme to the other. That is until the thought runs out of energy or momentum and stops. It rests until some force displaces it.

Recently, a client asked for help explaining the difference between planning for a transition and planning a transformation. Since Transformation seems to be one of the buzz words of the moment, I began to wonder what made the two thinking processes different, and what did they really mean. My polarity thinking friend suggested that transitions plan for certainty, or near certainty and transformation plan for uncertainty.  I disagreed.

I think of a transition as the pause between takes, what happens between two clearly defined states.  It’s when we assess, evaluate or figure out our position, how close or far. Transformation, that’s the feeling we have on arrival, we made it so now what.

In other words, if the client has a clear objective as in to take a specific distant hill, then transition plans incorporate the certainty that elevations will be changing on route and insures the team’s prepared for the journey. When it knows  what changes to expect along the way, then it’s transition ready. Transformation focuses on arrival, different conditions and challenges it doesn’t know, but can imagine arrival makes possible.  After all, isn’t that why the objective was to take the hill?  Wasn’t it about the advantage that being on top offers?

Put another way, imagine what you want to do is known, like traveling to another location.  Transitions focus on the journey, how long will it take, buying tickets or planning the route. Transformation planning asks how the change in location affects your current activities.  Transitions are more whole body time shifts, where as transformation puts your head in the future while the rest of your physical body remains grounded in the present.

November’s topic for the monthly strategy discussion focused on Transformation Readiness. Before I managed to summarize the conversation and post notes,news about the sale of Mariano’s to Kroger caught my eye. and then I also spotted  an interview with CEO, Bob Mariano on the Chicago Booth website.

If you are not familiar with Chicago, then let me explain that Mariano’s was a new entry into the grocery store business. By coincident, just as they had opened a few stores one of Chicago’s main competitors –Safeway decided to close all of its Dominick’s stores. This meant Mariano’s acquired 10 of the closed stores and their debt fueled expansion took off.  That’s when Kroger came calling.

Since I had already been thinking about  transformation questions , as in how do you get transformation ready, I thought it worth sharing these responses.  Take a peek, and let me know what you think, are the example transitions or evidence of transformation readiness?

Scenario A: I think that Mariano’s namesake, CEO and founder, Bob nailed it when he said:

“At Mariano’s, we tried to push further. We continue to push.  What I mean by push is to expose the customer to different and unique things and allow them the opportunity to tell you, ‘No, I don’t like that,’ or ‘Yes, I like that.’”

Scenario B: Or maybe you prefer the spin by CEO of Shazam when asked about the increasing gap between growth in the amount of information and its utilization. ” …How do you improve data intelligence?”

“That’s definitely the case [that there is a data knowledge gap] and for years we have been talking about data warehousing, or capturing that data, but turning information into data intelligence is a new journey for many companies…”

Or, how about the Gambling industry insiders view who characterizes difference between digitizing or converting your industry to the reality post conversion this way:

Advancements in technology has brought about a rapid digitization of gambling and almost every other industry. Some have managed to exploit these developments more than others and I think that the gambling industry is at the forefront of how well technology can be applied to a domain.

As an industry we must be open to change and pro-actively look at how we can exploit such technologies to provide a better and more entertaining experience to our customers. For example, the progress in Touch ID has enabled us to allow LeoVegas iPhone app customers to log in to the casino using only their fingerprint.

Are you wondering why distinguishing between transitions and transformations matter? Or, even better, how your business can take greater advantage of the widespread availability, access and flexibility that a fully digitized world creates?

Great, now you are thinking strategically.

How Old Metrics may strand you strategically

Ever stIMG_0267op to consider how the ever present changes going on around you make your own transformation easier?

John Hagel relatively recent blog post describes the opposite.

In a world of accelerating change, one of our greatest imperatives is to “unlearn” – to challenge and ultimately abandon some of our most basic beliefs about how the world works and what is required for success.

Accenture a few years ago noticed that many different companies had shifted their approach to strategy. Perhaps, the availability of cheap, powerful computing capacity and Big Data are responsible for driving changes in strategy development as more organizations using technology find it easier to build consideration of the future into their present planning.   Hagel, a long time fan of scenario planning would applaud these efforts too.

With the rise of automated business processes, analytics too get incorporated automatically to enhance decision making and may be simultaneously compromising management capabilities to internalize all of these changes or understand the underlying dynamics traditional measures mask. Several articles provided case studies in different industries provided the basis of discussion around transformation (see the bottom of the post for specific article links).

how to lie with staticsSuccessful organizations rely on their strategy to put forward action plans, realize new ideas while averting risk. Statesmen and management alike find themselves in precarious places when they assume a trend will continue without change. Many statistical methods and decision-makers use of data remain unchanged from 1954 when Daniel Huff first published How to Lie with Statistics. His timeless book describes very simply the perils of improper use of methods that were designed to capture and explain if not contextualize the significance of singular observations, or data.   The current transformations enabled by technology have done more to alter behavior than organizations seem to recognize. That’s the path our discussion took.

The capability for insight

Prospective vs retrospective cohort analysis  and data mining techniques are far from new. Though the volume and speed of available data to digest and process with ever The increasingly sophisticated tools and the ease with which volume and speed of available can be processed may help as well as hinder their digestion. Sure the time to test alternative scenarios may be faster, but how do you choose the model?

Do you begin with the intended outcome? The scientific method and numerous models from multiple disciplines make it possible to isolate factors, determine their significance, and estimate alternative scenarios and assess how these variations produce changes in impact.

Similarly, the cross pollination of data modeling from one discipline into multiple industries and use cases continue to shift management beliefs regarding the importance of specific factors and interactions in their processes. The perennial blind spot denies many organizations and their leadership the insight necessary to transform both their internal strategic thinking process and business operating models. Last month’s discussion of McDonald’s and Coca-Cola illustrated how easily leadership misinterpreted fluctuating performance as temporal issues versus recognizing structural factors. It’s one thing to balance efficiency and effectiveness, quality and satisfaction and another to manage awareness of change and insights necessary to your continued survival.

What else thinking

“…both the digital world and the physical one are indispensable parts of life and of business. The real transformation taking place today isn’t the replacement of the one by the other, it’s the marriage of the two into combinations that create wholly new sources of value.  “

The sudden availability of online data tracking provided many organizations with the proper capability to understand user behavior differently. A whole new industry arose to focus on interpretation while creating of new measures while also introducing new thinking about effectiveness in sales, customer service, training etc.  Metrics, once created to prove out a strategy or an idea, now leave many organizations vulnerable until they build up the capacity to understand this new thinking let alone make corresponding operational changes necessary to sustain their business.

This is not the story of companies who fail to adapt such as Kodak who invented digital cameras only to retain their focus on film; but maybe it is.

http://www.cognoise.com/index.php?topic=17598.0Computerized reporting dashboards summarize specific indicators or activity associated with managing process or business relevant factors. The time and reporting cost savings that result from the automatic generation and ready access to information by managers and executives reinforce existing thinking and leave little room for understanding wider changes that may be impacting their business. It wasn’t long ago that analysts, and teams of them, spent their entire day pulling data and then calculating critical statistics detailing the effectiveness and efficiency of organizational activities to create reports for senior management. These efforts also made them accountable by insuring the data was clean, verifying whether outliers were real or indicative of a model failing to fully capture the wider dynamics. I was once one of those managers.  Today, automated reporting has eliminated many of the people capable of deeper data exploration and who chose what data, which statistics and the context necessary to understand the situation. The second problem is that data shared graphically or in tables never tell the whole story, though infographics do try.

A good analyst is taught to review the data and results, double-check whether the model or calculated results makes sense. Sure managers and executives may be quicker to detect aberrations and then raise questions but , how many of them have the time, patience or skills to test their ideas or intuitions? I imagine very few if any. Where are these available resources and how widely known are they to questioning executives?   How might the dashboard provide additional information to help frame the results executives see as they too seek to understand or make sense of the results?

Outside in thinking

Established data flow processes and automated reporting do deliver great advantages but they may also explain why outsiders find it easier than insiders to create new business models.   Where’s the out of the box thinking? And how can different data help?

Sure, it’s easy to blame regulatory requirements or compensation structures incentivized to focus on effectiveness and efficiency that leave little latitude to notice opportunity. For example, in the airline industry route fares were once set by regulations. The minimum fares were intended to cover airlines operating expenses that both insured passenger safety and access to air travel in more locations where market forces may lead airlines to cut corners. Deregulation may have given airlines additional freedom but many manage their business using the same metrics that they report to the Department of Transportation. Likewise in Healthcare, the imposition of new regulatory requirements came with new metrics that forced hospitals to focus on patient outcomes not just their costs.

When executives bottom line focus limits their thinking as an exercise in how making corrections in operation may maximize that number they overlook other contexts. Data quality issues should surface quickly in most organizations, but what if another factor created the data issue? A misplaced data point, or inconsistent treatment of the content of a data field rarely explain all aberrations in the results.   Weather, for example exemplifies a ubiquitous, exogenous variable. Observable data fluctuations may be directly or indirectly responsible by affecting other more directly connected factors, such as a snowstorms that change people’s activity plans. I’m not familiar with any automated reporting system that will automatically create a footnote to the data point associated with the arrival of a snowstorm. The reviewer is forced to remember or manually if possible add the footnote for others.

Bigger transformations to come

Bain believes there are significant implications for every organization that result from this digital and physical combination of innovations , they call Digical. It’s not easy to keep up with the corresponding behavioral shifts that result from these rapidly changing technological capabilities.

Focusing exclusively on efficiency and cost data helped management measure impact in the old era, though still necessary today they may no longer suffice. Do you know how social behaviors of your customers impact your bottom line? The technologies to support your business, such as your website or your cash register misses out on the social behaviors evident on sites like Facebook, Twitter, Yelp or even their bank. Mapping the ecosystem and then aligning the digital tracking data can now be supplemented with sensor data that may be anonymous to specific customers but can inform movement and actions relevant to your engagement.http://intronetworks.com/making-amazing-connections-siggraph-asia/

Naturally, as mentioned earlier bias plays a role in our inability to notice the significance of new data. The more we automate and configure systems to measure what we always knew mattered, the less likely we are to be able to recognize new data and its significance. What should you the analyst and you the executive do to counteract these factors?

Takeaways

Monitor the activity of smaller companies as they experiment to learn what’s most relevant.

Don’t make assumptions, exercise strategic intentions to become more open receptive and curious about anomalies and be more creativity and persistent in identifying the drivers or possible factors.

Historically, metrics were an output designed to assess the validity of your strategy –did it work and/or deliver value. Not it’s time for strategic thinking to view metrics as an input. The use of statistics enabling analysis tools partnered with business knowledge and acumen must be part of communicating to higher levels in the business.

Often we measure the wrong things because the incentives are misaligned. Am I paid based on my proven ability to produce widgets at specific levels , or to produce effective, sustainable results for the business, not just my business unit?

Computers are useless they can only give you answers. For strategy, validating the questions may be important but so too is taking the time and effort needed to determine even better questions.

ARTICLES

Alternative case examples

Bain’s study and understanding of the state of “digical” transformation:
http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/leading-a-digical-transformation.aspx#sidebar
Fast Food
http://www.qsrmagazine.com/reports/drive-thru-performance-study-2014
Wireless
http://www.rcrwireless.com/20140812/opinion/reality-check-new-metrics-for-a-changing-industry-tag10
Television
http://fortune.com/2014/10/23/adobe-nielsen-tv-ratings-system/
Gaming
http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2014-03-10-social-currency-has-real-value

Mobile Strategy–an imperative for your future

Note to readers: The graphic to the left was found After the  October 18, 2013 discussion, inspired by articles listed at the bottom of this post.   

Does your near term performance hinge on your understanding of mobile  technology, and if so, how critical a role does it play?

Infographic-2013-Mobile-Growth-Statistics-MediumToday mobile platform adoption rates outpace the technology’s downward pricing.  The dual benefits of convenience and constant connectivity offer irresistible value and overwhelm the initial cost bumps associated with implementation.  It’s not merely the anytime anywhere connectivity with your social network that makes mobile valuable. Mobile technologies offers direct access to increasing varieties of information at the tip of your finger anytime and every where (if there’s wifi).

Questions that used to leave us uncertain, can be easily answered.  For example:  How soon until the next bus arrives?  What’s the best route to any intended destination?  What can I make for dinner? Who has the best price? What’s the name of this song playing right now?

Short message services–SMS, Geo Positioning software – GPS, Google search, untold numbers of product and service applications and internet browser capability are now built into multiple mobile devices.  They allow everyone to travel lighter and access the information needed at the right time.

For business, if you don’t have a mobile strategy yet,  best make it a priority.  At least that’s what the discussion participants concluded.  Skeptical of consumers ability to fully integrate many of these technology opportunities into their daily routine or modify their existing habits and behavior,  companies who have yet to play in this space will find it harder and harder to catch up.

The strategic opportunities continue to evolve in tandem with the spreading  uses for assistive mobile technologies.  For example, a prudent strategy  in consumer marketing might be to incorporate  the technologies to enhance the user experience—especially as no clear killer sales application that deploys these technologies exist.

·         Amazon with all its technology savvy and leadership in the online sales market leveraging its platform hasn’t found a way to fully leverage mobile capabilities to increase sales.  Mobile assistive technologies, like Google maps represent a hybrid.

·         Twitter, hot off its successful IPO has yet to grow actual sales for any business.

·         Facebook’s use of GPS allows business to learn more identifiable information about the consumers as they become proximate to their store,  but have yet to prove predictable in driving retail sales.

Advantage

What advantage then can mobile technologies really deliver?

There seems no limit to the additional utility Search Engines provide.  Mobile technologies allow roving users access to  public, private or personal sources that the engines verify and validate boost both their value and help build loyalty incentive programs.  Increasing numbers of gamification applications also exemplify how mobile technologies drive growth opportunities  by enabling repeat sales through mutual identification of merchants and existing customers.

More interesting,  mobile technologies helping to optimize each stage in the sales cycle sequence.  Applications that make use of two way transmission—driving traffic both by or to customers is just the beginning.  Efforts that allow discovery and exploit more stages in the cycle help determine when, where and how the transmission proves itself  more efficient and effective.  Should your business deploy mobile to simplify checkout? Or simplify merchandise location and availability?

In the ongoing evolution of technology, strategy that focuses on deploying tools for competitive advantage or advancement isn’t enough.  Strategy needs to consider how the new technology influences your revenue flow.

Possessing mobile technology isn’t merely a lower cost play. Strategic opportunities increase when it’s used intentionally to offer stakeholders learning opportunities.  Can you give your sales people the most up to date information on the customer’s past purchases, or your customers’ suggestions for product use, installation or enrichment?   Present technology capabilities and big data offer business opportunity to accumulate metadata and create richer customer profiles.  Mobile brings them together by putting the specific customer into the present transaction equation.

15 years ago, business wondered how, what and when E-Commerce would change their reality.  Today, forward planning organizations recognize mobile technologies as a similar force of permanent change.  Advantage will flow to those organizations who get out to test and experience for themselves the many features mobile technologies offer them directly.  These options offer unique understandings and help them translate mobile technologies’ anytime, anywhere access options into business value.

Strategy that activates customer and supplier value goes beyond capturing attention and offering incentives to drive traffic.  The strategy must consider the fuller customer experience and increase the odds of success by investing in developing future capabilities such as cross training staff and directing resources that  effect cross-promotion , understanding  both crowdsourcing and influence peddling opportunities.

Walmart’s recent experience demonstrates the shifting control customers now possess.  A computer glitch with  the Federal WIC program’s system communications prevented enforcement of  purchase limits at Walmart’s Point of Sale.  A customer tweet  flooded Walmart with these customers who exploited the system failure to their advantage and  Walmart received the short term benefits.

Summary of take aways

  1.  Confirmation that organizations must be actively trying to understand the technology, otherwise they may never get the benefits.  For now, obvious value is limited to facilitating adaptions to  marketing .  Eventually both seller and buyer will reach the same understanding but the advantage will continue to flow to those who worked hard out front and made it easier for their customers to both benefit and settle in as they who to trust and where to be.  Switching costs are always serious and so it pays to be out front.
  2.  Best to think through how you deploy these technologies carefully.  What opportunities will make things easier for you consumers, and then work to simplify the individual steps and actual transactions.  For example, Millenials view mobile as an essential service and continue to need and expect universal Wifi and battery charging wherever they go.  Are you helping them?  If not, your access to this key demographic will be limited.
  3. Balance the cost/benefit of information and investment.  Mobile is a work in progress like any technology, don’t put all your eggs in one basket.
  4. Opening up of information transmission in more places and with more transactions suggests that additional paths to capitalize on this phenomenon.  Your strategy should seek to know and learn, as in where you can produce added convenience, respond and simplify steps in your own or your customers’ process, find out more about customer behavior and your ability to learn with  them  in order to  gain strategic advantage.
  5.  Continue to seek out pockets of advantage—customer  loyalty is easy, instant access, centralize connections for your customer to one place is another.
  6. Transparency too is key. Mobile comes with real time imperatives and be sure your back up plans work.  Open Table app for example failed to deliver real time answers or reservations, which diminished its value and its opportunity to build customer loyalty.

ARTICLES:

Mobile Now—Strategy +Business June 2013

http://www.strategy-business.com/media/file/00196_Mobile_Now.pdf

The 6 Biggest Mistakes Made on Enterprise Mobile Strategy

Posted by Adam Bookman in Wired on August 5, 2013 at 10:30am

 http://insights.wired.com/profiles/blogs/6-biggest-mistakes-mobile-strategy#ixzz2glZMCXXu

 Global mobile statistics 2013 Home

http://mobithinking.com/mobile-marketing-tools/latest-mobile-stats

And, an Optional  case Illustration.

A look At Quiri- Retail Intelligence using mobile crowd workers

http://techcrunch.com/2013/10/02/quri-a-retail-intelligence-platform-using-mobile-crowdworkers-scores-10-million-from-matrix-others/

Is it Too Late for a Web Strategy?

Old spice man

If you don't know this man, then you're missing out on one of the more popular twists in popular culture and marketing of 2010. 

This is the Old Spice campaign's man of mystery.  Intentionally I did not insert the web video, nor am I interested in chasing down the viewer stats, though sales report isn't great.  It's here because the ad reference exemplifes multi-channel linked marketing strategy and came up  in last Friday's monthly Chicago Booth Alumni Club's Discussion around  Strategic Management Practices.

Wearing my research hat, and doubling as a typical consumer, the first place I turned to find the reference was to type the key word phrase "old spice man" into my google search bar located at the top of my web browser. My search was not to purchase, engage in conversation or to gain proximity to someone with product experience –that would need  some different key words.  The campaign as well as my search process shows the evolution of the internet and the effect of its influence in our lives.  The shifting trends exhibited below in this wonderful chart  was the focus by Chris Anderson and Michael Wolff in the provocatively titled September 2010 article in Wired The Web is Dead, long live the Internet

Internet traffic trends 2010

CISCO compiled data using the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA). The chart suggests that Video and Peer to Peer traffic is increasing while the use of the world wide web is declining.  This data is somewhat misleading and the chart's suggestions that mobile apps, and other specialized channel options, will displace the web browser  is not so clear-cut.

Is this graph a credible and reliable translation of the geek speak from  CAIDA?  A more recent  analysis than what appeared in Wired, expresses the following:

" Continuing its growth in traffic, connectivity, and complexity, the current Internet is full of applications with rapidly changing characteristics."

Overall, CAIDA has found that traffic on the internet continues to grow,  which is not adequately represented by the two- dimensional graph CISCO and WIRED depicted. Growth does accurately reflect the transition and growing emergence of traffic off the world wide web and into  alternative internet based transmission paths (e.g. mobile based and other applications that allow real time streaming).  

This same transition mimics strategies used by effective  marketers who link the brand messages and campaigns across  multiple media platforms.  Key words provide the bridge. The more consistent their use across the growing number of media platforms,  the more certain an organization's promotion efforts will  intersect key consumer touch points on or offline.   Ideally, consumers pick up these same key words  and carry them across other natural communication channels, further enhancing the brand's reputation and in theory  increasing sales.

If your business is selling Search Engine Optimization (SEO) this emphasis on key words appears  great for business. It's not however where a capable marketing strategy should invest the majority of its budget.  Not merely because there is some danger to pursuing this strategy (see the The dirty little secrets of search in last week's New York Times); but the greater, more complex objective is reputation management and not key word optimization.  

 Historically, brand owners/creators controlled media messaging and placement.  To successfully sell, you "paid" for the privilege of being placed in front of consumers walking through the yellow pages or by a billboard, listening over radio/TV  or their eyeballs scanning newspaper or specialty publications. Product packaging, placement and promotion  are often  budgeted separately and only occasionally linked for a "special" promotion (e.g. cause marketing or a contest).  The rise of the world wide web, added the category of "owned" media to the marketing mix and budgets had to cover the cost of website development, content writers and traffic analysis, including SEO.  With Social Media, a third area– "earned" warrants increasing budget and management attention to monitor the customer-created channels and chatter of your brand enthusiasts  as well as brand detractors. (see complete description in Branding in the Digital Age by David Edelman). 

 The Edelman article's case study of a TV manufacturer across one touch point within the wider consumer decision journey proves far more  instructive than my earlier reference to the Old Spice ad and its multi-channel focus. 

"A costly disruption of the journey across the category made clear that the company’s new marketing strategy had to deliver an integrated experience from consider to buy and beyond . In fact, because the problem was common to the entire category, addressing it might create competitive advantage."    

Unlike Old Spice, the manufacturer opted to shift the marketing emphasis away from paid media.  Focusing on owned and earned media seems to enhance the effectiveness of their key words and multi-channel linkages, and engage traffic where it mattered most at the buy, and enjoy, advocacy, bond  touch points. This is not a prescription for all brands, but the case is instructive in identifying the disconnects and deficiencies in common web based strategies, or even of marketing extravaganzas disconnected from the ongoing conversations that are circling your business, product and/or brand.

Whether or not you belief in Chris Anderson's prognosis about the death  of the Web or buy into David Edelman's Consumer Decision Journey research, few organizations appear to have fully leveraged these changes.  Increasingly, an ability to execute and efficiently allocate resources to address the demands presented by the growing number of communication channels  will  distinguish successful companies from their competitors.  The changes create more opportunities for strategy to take a more commanding role in managing and driving the combined efforts, either internally or with the help of outside specialty firms.

Additonal Discussion Take Aways

  • Social networks are informative, free sources of intelligence that naturally build out and generate mutual trust and benefits to buyers and sellers. 
  • The role of the marketer is merely to influence and no longer the producer/director of the brand experience.
  • The responsibility for marketing  is changing and increasingly is upending internal role limitations  and requiring participation from unlikely sources e.g. corporate governance, communication standards and guidelines.  Employees share roles with customers and the more acquainted with internal policies, strategies and planning the more they can aide and assist in  wider message consistency. 
  • Authenticity has become ever more important.
  • Fluidity and increasing knowledge of terminology around the digital communications space is a valuable skills set…not just for marketers and IT folks. 
  • As reputation management rises and people do business more and more with the people that they know,  is there anything really being created of value, and are other marketing and sales efforts as necessary?
  • How do these lessons translate or enhance B2B sales? 
  • It's not the web vs. the internet differentiation that matters, as much as recognizing how one innovation(social media)  has brought into focus an array of  deficiencies and gaps within an organization (marketing departments) as well as an industry (e.g. advertising) The challenge is how to best integrate the old with the new. 
  • In the end, the prescription to know your customer before creating your strategy remains the first and foremost lesson. Knowing what your customer wants will always be helpful but successful business requires more.
  • True differentiation in products being marketed remain beneficial but the emphasis should be toward innovation in developing products. 
  • Important to remember the shape of the adoption curves with new technology and Chris Anderson's point that new doesn't replace old. New merely creates more table space to accommodate more preferences.  The challenge is the frequency we change, resort and revisit our marketing activities and resource priorities. 
  • Both  articles confirm the importance of social media and keeping up with changing technologies.  They also call attention to the  the challenges organizations  face in trying to bring them together  to create successful communities around their products and/or brands.

 

Any added thoughts, perspectives or cases are welcome.

Added citations

Edelman makes some of the same points in this article:

Four ways to get more value from digital marketing

By David C. Edelman, McKinsey Quarterly, March 2010

https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Four_ways_to_get_more_value_from_digital_marketing_2556

 

Trust Agents, Using the web to build Influence    by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith

NOW Revolution, 7 shifts to make your business faster   by Jay Baer and Amber Naslund